Redesigning Materials: Second Time Around

Many designers and brands are increasingly turning to recycled materials to lessen their footprint on the environment, yet these materials are often misconstrued as second rate to their newer alternatives.

We aim to break this stereotype by highlighting some of our favourite examples where good design makes all the difference, why second time around should be your first choice.

 

Modernising Vintage

Every pair of Re/Done jeans is unique, each made from some vintage Levi’s that have been taken apart at the seams and remade into a contemporary style.

Buying Re/Done’s pre-loved jeans helps you reap the benefits of the previous wearer – from the comfort of pre-worn denim to the aged details, such as frayed pockets and colour fade, that denote its journey before it arrived in your wardrobe.

 

Re/Done

Re/Done


 Practical Repurposing

Since 2005 brand to trust Elvis & Kresse has been transforming decommissioned fire-hoses from the London Fire Brigade into high-end accessories. The durability and tactility of the fire-hose material makes it a great alternative to virgin leather, perfect for structured bags and travel accessories.

Better yet, 50% of the profits from the range are donated to the Fire Fighters Charity. The latest design is the Post Bag – get complimentary monogramming on this classic design when you buy before February 14th.  

Elvis and Kresse

Post Bag by Elvis & Kresse

 

Artisanal Craftsmanship

Nosouj’s meticulous approach to sustainable fashion taps into the heritage of craftsmanship in its Jordan location. The distinctive textiles used in each bag design are handwoven from discarded fabrics using traditional techniques.

The use of recycled fabrics adds individuality to each accessory, bringing colour and textural variation to the striped fabrics, while reviving and transforming the unwanted into a piece of artisanal luxury that is made to last.

Nosouj

Pom pom clutch by Nosouj

 

Transforming Trash

The much-celebrated Parley for the Oceans trainer by Adidas is made from plastic and fishing nets that have been recovered from oceans. The partnership has also recently announced a swimwear range, which uses a technical fabric called Econyl that offers the same performance properties as conventional nylon.

Each design references the watery origins of its materials, providing a visual reminder of this pressing environmental issue.

Adidas x Parley for the Oceans

Adidas x Parley for the Oceans


Locally Sourced

Brand to trust Soneva Fushi has invited visual artists Tobias Møhl and Maria Koshenkova to the luxury Maldives location to create artworks made exclusively from recycled glass materials and other objects found on the resort.

Tobias’ sophisticated style can be traced back to Venetian glass techniques, while Maria uses glass in combination with other materials for abstract and site-specific contexts. We’re looking forward to seeing the resulting exhibition of this artist’s programme that will draw both inspiration and materials from the local area.

 

Platter by Tobias Møhl

Platter by Tobias Møhl

 

Norwegian Wood by Maria Koshenkova

Norwegian Wood by Maria Koshenkova

 

 

Future Fabrics

There is also a wide range of innovative sustainable textiles that will be making their way into your wardrobes over the coming years. Each year the Future Fabrics Expo (run by not-for-profit The Sustainable Angle) showcases the best of these future-facing fabrics that hold potential to reduce the environmental impact of the fashion industry. 

The 2017 Expo was held in January and featured a range of exciting textiles to look out for – from leather alternatives made from natural rubber and jellyfish, to fabric made from citrus waste created by the Italian juice industry. Check out the Expo Online now and look out for next year’s event for more exciting innovations! 

 

6th Future Fabrics Expo, January 2017

6th Future Fabrics Expo, January 2017

 

If you enjoyed this, you might like to read Keep it Natural: Alternatives to Cotton and Waste Not Wednesday: Reduce Your Waste

Sophie Corfan